The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion

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The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion
Freeing Yourself from Destructive Thoughts and Emotions

Germer, C. (author), Sharon Salzberg (foreword); Guilford Press, 2009

 

Book Description
“Buck up.” “Stop feeling sorry for yourself.” “Don’t ruin everything.” When you are anxious, sad, angry, or lonely, do you hear this self-critical voice? What would happen if, instead of fighting difficult emotions, we accepted them? Over his decades of experience as a therapist and mindfulness meditation practitioner, Dr. Christopher Germer has learned a paradoxical lesson: We all want to avoid pain, but letting it in—and responding compassionately to our own imperfections, without judgment or self-blame—are essential steps on the path to healing. This wise, and eloquent book illuminates the power of self-compassion and offers creative, scientifically grounded strategies for putting it into actions. You’ll master practical techniques for living more fully in the present moment—especially when hard-to-bear emotions arise—and for being kind to yourself when you need it the most. (from the back cover)

 

 

Reviews

 

“Self-compassion is the ground of all emotional healing, and Dr. Germer has produced an invaluable guide. Written with great clarity, psychological wisdom, and warmth, this book will serve anyone seeking practical and powerful tools that free the heart."
 Tara Brach, PhD, author of Radical Acceptance

 

“In this important book, Christopher Germer illuminates the myriad synergies between mindfulness and compassion. He offers skillful and effective ways of making sure that we are inviting ourselves, as well as others, to bathe in and benefit from the kind heart of awareness itself, and from the actions that follow from such a radical and sane embrace."
Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD
    author of Arriving at Your Own Door and Letting Everything Become Your Teacher

 

“Loving-kindness and compassion are the basis for wise, powerful, sometimes gentle, and sometimes fierce actions that can really make a difference—in our own lives and those of others....In the following pages you will find a scientific review, an educational manual, and a practical step-by-step guide to developing greater loving-kindness and self-compassion every day."
from the Foreword by Sharon Salzberg, author of Lovingkindness

 

“Explains both the science and practice of developing kindness toward ourselves and others. Dr. Germer offers powerful and easily accessible steps toward transforming our lives from the inside out. It's never too late to start along this important path."
Daniel J. Siegel, MD, author of The Mindful Brain

 

“An elegant and practical guide to cultivating self-compassion, by a dedicated and wise clinician and meditation teacher. The author offers time-honored practices and exercises with the potential to illuminate and transform the background chatter of our minds that determines so much of the course of our lives."
Samuel Shem, MD, author of The House of God

 

“A superb introduction to mindfulness meditation....This brilliantmanual demonstrates how by accepting and embracing emotions, one can move to a higher plane of harmony with oneself and others. Interspersed with supporting data from psychology experiments, this book provides practical, life-changing self-help techniques and suggestions for further readings and practice. Highly recommended.”
Library Journal

 

“Those of us treating people who struggle with addictions know all too well how clients' feelings of shame or self-blame often undermine efforts to achieve effective interventions. In this remarkable book, Germer shows readers how to use mindfulness and self-compassion to open up to their pain and treat themselves with kindness. Ideal for recommendation to clients who have fallen off the wagon or who are blaming themselves for failed relationships, lost jobs, and scattered lives, this book offers a way out of a vicious cycle."
G. Alan Marlatt, PhD, Department of Psychology and Director,
    Addictive Behaviors Research Center, University of Washington